Web 2.0 as a Concept

June 22, 2008

I had an epiphany of sorts this past week while I was away at school.  For every new technology trend to hit the market there is both the technology and the underlying concepts of said technology.  Basically, the technology is just the tool and the concept is what defines the tool.  This seems somewhat obvious but I think I’ve taken it for granted.

A fellow Millennial had the idea of creating a flickr account to capture all of the pictures from our year long graduate school adventure.  As we all know, flickr is a an online community for sharing pictures and video.  The key words here are online community.  Online to me represents the centralization of these digital assets in the cloud and not hiding them on the desktops of 90 individuals.  Community is defined as ‘common, public, shared by all or many’ and represents the ability for those 90 individuals to contribute to and view these centralized digital assets.  So online is our Web 1.0 concept and community is our Web 2.0 concept.

So our Millennial friend was the first to start a community and notified the class on the 12th of this month.  Following that we had another individual post pictures to SharePoint on the 17th and then a different person added pictures to Picasa on the 21st.  Both of these individuals are not of the Millennial variety.  So now we have three individuals building three separate communities with assets in three different tools. 

I believe each of these individuals made great Web 2.0 tool decisions however they missed the boat on some key Web 2.0 concepts.  Now we have three communities with the same intent, essentially creating a competitive environment.  This either forces folks to share with not one community, but all three, or even worse, not share at all because the the process has been convoluted.

In our situation the usefulness of the tools is evident but the concepts of the social computing was lost on some folks.  This is a small example with a big take away.  I learned that regarless of how cool or interesting a technology may be, it’s the concept that is important. 

Advertisements

Millennials at School

June 7, 2008

Last month I started a few new chapters in my life.  I got married and I started grad school.  The Millennial marriage was good times but a topic for a different day.  This post is about my reintroduction to academia and how in the next twelve months I will be working very closely with a diverse group of individuals from three generations.  I do not have demographic information for this years program yet but I would say the group is predominately of the Xer variety with a handful each of Boomers and Millennials.

After our first weekend of class I can say one thing for sure.  Regardless of how tech savvy our generation is, we cannot compete against the years of experience the other two generations have.  In three days I heard more stories about successes and failures within the enterprise than I could ever imagine.  I guess in ten to twenty years I’ll have as many stories, but right now, fact is, I don’t.

This just reminded me how important it is for diversity withing work groups.  Not just of race, gender, and nationality, but of generation.  Each generation has something beneficial to offer the group as a whole.  Wisdom, experience, and lessons learned coupled with fresh ideas and technical know how is a powerful combination for any organization.

Look for more to come about Millenials at School over the next year.